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beef musings sous vide techniques The French Laundry Thomas Keller

Contemplating Christmas Dinner

I’m in charge of Christmas dinner again, and I’m still a little torn on what I should make. The adventurous part of me wants to take a rib roast and separate the cap meat (i.e. calotte, deckle) from the actual ribeye…kinda like this:

ribeye-partsFrom left: ribs, eye, cap.
Picture from Ideasinfood.com

Then I can cook the cap meat sous vide to a nice medium rare in attempt to partially recreate this dish:

Calotte de Beouf GrilléeThe French Laundry’s Calotte de Beouf Grillée (12.08.08)

For the center cut, I would oven roast it to medium rare and end up with a sort of deconstructed prime rib cooked two ways.

The other part of me wants to go old school and roast a nice beef tenderloin or standing rib roast. I’ve been successful with rib roasts before but have never tried a tenderloin. But as old school as a tenderloin roast might sound, I’d probably endup cooking that sous vide anyway.

Aside from the main courses, Yorkshire puddings are definitely on the agenda, and I think my wife is going to make her garlic bacon mashed potatoes. I am extremely tempted to make this Macaroni and Gravy recipe by fellow food blogger Lainie as a second entree, and I know my cousin Cristy, who hosted Thanksgiving, has something up her sleeve.

If you’re looking for some Christmas recipes, you might want to give these a try:

I’m not sure if I’ll be posting again before Christmas, but if I don’t, I hope everyone has a happy and safe holiday season!

Categories
beef Best of Inuyaki recipes

Individual Yorkshire Puddings

from Cook’s Illustrated

Yorkshire PuddingYorkshire pudding is a traditional accompaniment to Prime Rib and are usually made while the roast is resting. It’s pretty easy to make and it’s cool watching them puff up to their actual size.

Prepare the Yorkshire pudding batter after the roast has roasted for 1 hour, then, while the meat rests, add beef fat to the batter and get the puddings into the oven. While the puddings bake, complete the jus. An accurate oven temperature is key for properly risen puddings, so check your oven with an oven thermometer before making this recipe. Work quickly to fill the muffin tin with batter, and do not open the oven door during baking. Serves 12.

INGREDIENTS
3 large eggs, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups whole milk, at room temperature
1 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour (7 1/2 ounces)
3/4 teaspoon table salt
3 tablespoons beef fat

DIRECTIONS

  1. Whisk eggs and milk in large bowl until well combined, about 20 seconds.
  2. Whisk flour and salt in medium bowl and add to egg mixture
  3. Whisk quickly until flour is just incorporated and mixture is smooth, about 30 seconds.
  4. Cover batter with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature for at least 1 hour or up to 3 hours.
  5. After removing roast from oven, whisk 1 tablespoon of beef fat into batter until bubbly and smooth, about 30 seconds. Transfer batter to 1-quart liquid measuring cup or other pitcher.
  6. Measure 1/2 teaspoon of remaining 2 tablespoons beef fat into each cup of standard muffin pan.
  7. When roast is out of oven, increase temperature to 450 degrees and place pan in oven to heat for 3 minutes (fat will smoke).
  8. Working quickly, remove pan from oven, close oven door, and divide batter evenly among 12 muffin cups, filling each about 2/3 full. Immediately return pan to oven.
  9. Bake, without opening oven door, for 20 minutes
  10. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees and bake until deep golden brown, about 10 minutes longer.
  11. Remove pan from oven and pierce each pudding with skewer to release steam and prevent collapse. Using hands or dinner knife, lift each pudding out of tin and serve immediately.