Reinventing Loco Moco

by arnold on February 16, 2009

Loco Moco is a classic Hawaiian plate lunch offering that’s made up of hamburger patties smothered with gravy, topped with two eggs and served with rice and mac salad. If you’ve never seen it before, it looks like this:

We had dinner at Alan Wong’s Restaurant last week, and one of the menu items that jumped out at us was the “Mini Loco Moco” appetizer. The menu describes it as “mochi-crusted unagi meatloaf, sunny-side quail egg, wasabi kabayaki sauce,” and we just had to try it.

Mini Loco MocoAlan Wong’s “Mini Loco Moco”

Breaking it down, the mochi crust takes the place of the rice, the unagi meatloaf is the hamburger, quail egg replaces the hen egg and the wasabi kabayaki sauce replaces the gravy. It’s a perfect way to bring the loco moco concept into a fine dining setting, and it was excellent.

On the other end of the spectrum is Beard Papa and their Loco Moco Puff. It’s part of the Japanese cream puff chain’s localized Hawaii menu that also includes Breakfast Puffs, Creme Brulee Puffs, eclairs and pita sandwiches. Beard Papa describes their Loco Moco Puff as “two slices of oven-baked meat loaf, a fresh egg, sunny side up, onion-mushroom gravy with a dash of furikake on our signature puff shell,” which is more straightforward than Alan Wong’s. Basically, it’s an open-faced sandwich with the puff serving as the bread.

Loco Moco PuffBeard Papa’s Loco Moco Puff

The finished product looked good and tasted like loco moco, but the puff really didn’t contribute anything to the dish and would have been fine without it. What was a bit disturbing was watching them assemble it. Without a proper kitchen, all of the cooked elements were microwaved right in front of us, and even then, I’m still not sure how they cooked the egg properly. I guess if you were on the run, this might be decent alternative, but I’d still rather have an Egg McMuffin.

Nothing could ever replace the traditional preparation of loco moco, especially since I love the side benefit of mixing the warm gravy with the cold mac salad. However, I always like to see if classic dishes can be modernized or deconstructed without diluting its essence. While Alan Wong’s radical take on loco moco might look foreign to traditionalists, the end result was delicious, refined, and reminded me of the original.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

TonyC February 26, 2009 at 3:30 pm

almost ate here, but went to Pineapple Room instead. Wanted to try a hamburger made from local beef… from the sound of it, I made the right decision?

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Arnold March 1, 2009 at 12:27 pm

@TonyC: Alan Wong is fine dining, so I don’t think you can really compare it to the Pineapple Room. I thought Alan Wong’s interpretation of Loco Moco was great. There’s local beef on the menu, but they don’t do burgers. :)

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Kealani December 10, 2009 at 9:50 pm

I had Alan’s version of the Loco Moco a couple of weeks ago (I love Alan Wong!) – I couldn’t figure out how they got the mochi on it so I asked. They said it’s dried mochi grated on but I can’t see how it would come out chewy again. I’m stumped. Any clues?

My favorite AW dish is the Foie Gras Grilled Cheese Sandwich.

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Luisa June 25, 2012 at 10:12 am

I’m going to attempt Roy Yamaguchi’s Loco Moco Bistro style – it’s a far cry from the original but sounds amazing.

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Danielle October 1, 2012 at 11:34 am

Ewww tot he burnt eggs!

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